FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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General Questions

The KVMRT Sungai Buloh – Kajang Line is a passenger rail line running from Sungai Buloh to Kajang with high capacity trains running on a dedicated electrified track.

The KVMRT Sungai Buloh – Kajang Line runs from Sungai Buloh, cutting through the Kuala Lumpur City Center to Kajang, a distance of 51 km (of which 9.5 km is underground).

The full completion and opening was officiated by the YAB Prime Minister of Malaysia Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak in July 2017.

The KVMRT Sungai Buloh – Kajang Line is part of the Klang Valley Mass Rapid Transit project to provide an efficient, integrated and sustainable transport system for the Klang Valley. It was initiated by the Government of Malaysia in December 2010 under the Greater Kuala Lumpur / Klang Valley National Key Economic Area as detailed in the Economic Transformation Programme and is crucial for the targets of the NKEA to be achieved.

Rail-based public transport, such as the MRT, LRT, or commuter train, always forms the backbone of a city’s public transport system. This is because it can carry large numbers of people. It can move people quickly because it is not hindered by road traffic. It also removes vehicles from the road. One I MRT train carriage holding 300 passengers can remove the equivalent of 177 cars from the road. The Klang Valley will have a 10 million population by the year 2020 and the rakyat will need an efficient public transport system which can be achieved with MRT.

The Klang Valley has a shortage of rail-based public transport coverage. The Klang Valley has less than 20 km of rail per million population. Public transport oriented cities such as Singapore, Hong Kong and London have more than 40 km of rail per million population. The MRT project will boost rail-based public transport coverage in the Klang Valley significantly and the rakyat will benefit substantially by shorter travelling times and connectivity. Together with improved bus services, the number of people using public transport in the Klang Valley should increase from the current 17% to 50% in 2020.

The rail-based public transport service for the Sungai Buloh-Kajang corridor was proposed in 2006 by Prasarana. Feasibility studies, on the alignment and engagement with local authorities, were done since 2006. This alignment was also proposed subsequently under the Kuala Lumpur Draft City Plan in 2008 and under the Greater Kuala Lumpur/Klang Valley NKEA laboratory in July 2010, in its proposal for a MRT system for the Klang Valley. This alignment is also an amalgamation of two alignments proposed by MMC Gamuda Joint Venture Sdn Bhd in their Klang Valley MRT Project proposal. As such, the Government is confident to begin construction of this line because it has been well studied and the corridor, which has a catchment population of 1.2 million people, is in dire need to be served by rail-based public transport service.

Studies were previously done on the role of bus services including bus rapid transit (BRT) in the KL metropolitan area. This is still a road based public transport mode. In order to establish the dedicated transit ways, required to achieve the desired travel speeds, it will be necessary to reallocate significant amounts of road space. This will be difficult to achieve within the constrained street corridors in some locations, and may result in negative impacts on other road users that would prove unacceptable.

Rail-based public transport, such as the MRT, LRT, or commuter train is therefore best suited to forming the backbone of a city’s public transport system, because rail can carry large numbers of people and it is also not hindered by road traffic, as it travels along its own dedicated alignment. In addition, rail-based public transport modes are often considered more ‘attractive’ to potential users than buses. This is, perhaps, based partly on a perception of permanence and reliability that rail infrastructure gives users by its presence, especially on major public transport corridors.

The Klang Valley has a shortage of rail-based public transport coverage compared with most public-transport oriented cities.  Klang Valley has less than 20 km of rail per million population. Public transport oriented cities such as Singapore, Hong Kong and London have an average of 40 km of rail per million populations.

The MRT will generate economic value:

  • 130,000 jobs at various levels created during construction
  • In total, an average of RM21 billion GNI per annum generated over the next 10 years
  • The MRT project is also expected to push up property values. Better connectivity will result in property value appreciation
  • Estimated RM 300 million per annum increase in gross development value

The MRT will spur new developments at:

  • Rubber Research Institute development in Sungai Buloh
  • Warisan Merdeka
  • KL International Financial District
  • Cochrane Development

The MRT will boost commercial activity by:

  • Improved connectivity will bring customers to city centre shopping districts
  • Underground stations will have good linkages with shopping centres and nearby office areas
  • Stations will be integrated with commercial activity

The MRT is good for the environment:

  • Lower greenhouse gas emissions
  • Promote lower fuel consumption per capita

The MRT is safer:

  • Worldwide statistics show that rail transport is much safer than road transport

The MRT is more affordable:

  • Affordable fares
  • Cheaper means of transportation, especially with increasing petrol prices

The MRT is a key component of the Greater KL/KV NKEA:

  • MRT is crucial in the realization of the targets of the Greater KL/KV NKEA, which is to achieve top-20 economic growth and be among the global top-20 most liveable cities by 2020
  • Mobility is important to attract talent and multinational companies, key to generating economic activity
    Success of the Greater KL/KV NKEA will have an impact on the other NKEAs

Alignment

The proposed Sungai Buloh – Kajang Line runs through a densely developed area and provides direct links to the city center from the north-western and the south-eastern sector.

This corridor with a total population of 1.2m people is currently inadequately served by rail based networks.

Many factors come into play when an MRT alignment is determined. The overarching principle is benchmarked against the following:

  • Regional level, where fixed points are identified, where the line must serve. These are determined by factors such as serving areas, where there is no rail service at the moment, serving densely populated areas, serving activity centres such as the Central Business District, shopping centres or office blocks, and serving areas where there is potential future growth.
  • Engineering, social and environmental factors such as constructability, ridership, land acquisition, social and environmental impact, journey times and integration with existing systems.
  • Micro level, where local details are taken into consideration, via public feedback.

The proposed line is 51 km long, of which 9.5 km will be underground. Generally, the planned alignment runs underground within the city centre and will be elevated in the outskirts of the city.

The proposed station locations were determined by taking into consideration where there is high catchment of residential as well as commercial and business activities. The placement of stations is based on the following principles:

  • Catchment distribution related to land uses (residential and commercial centers)
  • Special generator areas (shopping centers, office complex, and high density development)
  • Land use potential in areas which could be developed as Transit Planning Zones
  • Availability of corridor for the rail alignment to minimize land acquisition and social impact
  • Engineering constraints (clearances of existing infrastructure, topography, geology)

It is necessary to recognize the need for compromise between these factors, where competing interests are encountered at a particular site.

Land Acquistion

The issue of land acquisition is governed by the Land Acquisition Act 1960 and the National Land Code and the body that is responsible for the issuance of notices, pertaining to land acquisition, is the Department of Director General of Land and Mines (KPTG).

The procedure for land acquisition, as outlined under Section 4 of the Act, is for KPTG in that particular state to put up notices, as close to the land as possible, informing the public that the general land area has been gazetted for possible acquisition. It is only after public feedback has been received, and consultations undertaken with various bodies, will the exact plots of land (to be acquired) be confirmed.

At this stage, under Section 8 of the Act, individual owners of the plots of land to be acquired will have to be notified directly. In most cases the actual area to be acquired would be much smaller. The procedure is the same for any piece of land that is to be acquired by the government.

The law stipulates that the alignment must be at least 6m away from the boundary of a piece of property. Land acquisition is governed by the Land Acquisition Act 1960 and the agency handling it is the Department of the Director-General of Land and Mines.

Environmental Issues

A EIA report is a study to identify, predict, evaluate, and communicate information about the impact(s) on the environment of a proposed project, while also detailing out the mitigating measures taken, prior to project approval and implementation.

The purpose of the EIA report is as a preventive approach to avoid costly mistakes caused by environmental factors in project planning and development.

In Malaysia, the EIA procedure was initiated in 1988 as a mandatory legislative requirement to protect and enhance the quality of the environment through licensing, setting of standards, coordination of research and dissemination of information to the public, under Section 34A of the Environmental Quality Act (EQA), of 1974.

The section further requires the Project Initiator of a Prescribed Activity to submit a report of the EIA to the Director General of Environmental Quality for approval. The EIA report must be prepared in accordance with the guidelines issued by the Department of Environment and contain an assessment of the impact of the Prescribed Activity on the environment as well as proposed mitigation measures.

Activities subject to EIA are prescribed under Environmental Quality (Prescribed Activities) (Environmental Impact Assessment) Order, of 1987. Nineteen (19) categories of projects are listed as prescribed activities, of which Railways and Transportation, including construction of MRT, is one. Additionally, Section 34A, EQA 1974 empowers the Minister to prescribe any activity which may have significant environmental impact(s) as a Prescribed Activity.

The EIA procedures adopted in Malaysia comprises preliminary assessment, detailed assessment, and a review for each assessment.

Preliminary assessment   

  • Initial assessment of the impacts due to activities that are prescribed
  • Initiated at pre-feasibility study stage of the development of an activity
  • Project options are identified
  • Any significant residual environmental impacts are made known
  • Preliminary report is reviewed by a technical committee in the DOE internally. However, where expertise within the Department is lacking, assistance from other government, and non-government, agencies may be sought.
  • The normal period allocated for a review is one month

Detailed assessment         

  • Undertaken for projects for which significant residual environmental impacts have been predicted in the preliminary assessment
  • Carried out based on specific terms of reference issued by an ad hoc Review Panel, appointed by the Director General
  • Detailed EIA Report submitted for approval by the Director General of Environment Quality, prior to the giving of approval by the relevant Federal or State Government authority for the implementation of the project
  • Detailed EIA Report is reviewed by the ad hoc Review Panel, chaired by the Director General.
  • DOE maintains a list of experts who may be called to sit as members of any Review Panel established. The selection of experts depends on the areas of environmental impacts to be reviewed.
  • The normal period of review is two months.

Recommendations arising out of review are transmitted, for consideration, to the relevant project approving authorities, to enable a decision on the project

There are technologically advanced measures to control noise, such as noise dampers and noise barriers, which will be adopted according to the independent consultant’s recommendations, after an in-depth study.

As in all projects, there is strict DOE approval and compliance requirements, failing which a stop work order may be issued. The consequence of this is far and wide and the contractors will not want this to happen. In addition, SPAD as the regulator, will ensure a rigorous monitoring mechanism to ensure strict compliance.

We agree there will be some temporary inconvenience to some people during the construction period, but all measures will be taken to minimize the inconvenience.

Traffic Impact Assessment and Traffic Management Scheme will be done before construction, with the construction activity planned in such a way as to ensure existing traffic flow is affected minimally, and if there is a need to divert, alternative routes will be identified for all necessary areas affected by construction activities.  PDP will have close cooperation and coordination with City Hall, local councils, Police, etc. to ensure minimal disruption to traffic flow.

There will be proper drainage design to ensure no flooding at the construction sites, which will have to be approved by the local authorities, before any commencement of work.

The public amenities such as water and power supply will be properly planned for relocation to avoid any disruptions in the future, if it is located at the construction sites. Approvals will also be sought from the various service providers even before such service relocation is carried out.

Yes, we expect some 9.5 km of the alignment to be underground. The tunneling and underground contract will be given to the contractor who can ensure that the work will be properly managed with no adverse impacts.

Responsibility for any adverse impact, or damage, caused by the project will be on the government with the PDP as the risk taker.

Station, Trains And Facilities

There are a total of 58 trains, each with 4 carriages.

Each carriage can hold 300 passengers, and with four carriages per train, a single train will have a maximum capacity of 1200 passengers, the equivalent of 12 buses or approximately 700 cars.

The train will travel at an average speed of 35 kilometers per hour. The frequency of the train will be approximately one train every 3.5 minutes.

Klang Valley residents will be able to get from one place to another quickly. The objective of the MRT is to increase the number of people using public transport, alleviate traffic congestion, and decrease travel time from one place to another. For example, a trip from Kota Damansara to Bukit Bintang, which normally takes 45 minutes by car or even longer during heavy traffic, will only take about 30 minutes via MRT. Traveling along the entire line, from Sungai Buloh to Kajang, will take 88 minutes.

Enablers

The Sungai Buloh-Kajang MRT Line will take five years to complete. While feeder bus routes for the line have been proposed and are currently on display to the public, SPAD will nevertheless conduct a thorough study on the demand and routing of such services. This will be completed ahead of the completion of the line and the feeder bus network will be ready when operation begins.

SPAD will also identify suitable locations near selected stations for bus interchanges to be located. This will enable passengers to transfer from MRT to buses conveniently.

There will be interconnectivity between the MRT, LRT, and KTM Komuter. There are two MRT-LRT interchanges, at Pasar Seni (Kelana Jaya line) and at Taman Maluri (Ampang line) and two MRT-KTM Komuter interchanges, at Sungai Buloh and Kajang. The MRT will also have a station near KL Sentral where the station will be linked to the transportation hub via an underground walkway with travellators, lifts, and ecalators. The distance between the MRT station and the KL Sentral complex is about 200m.

There will also be common ticketing planned making traveling for the rakyat in the Klang Valley seamless.

SPAD is currently implementing several initiatives under the National Key Result Area (NKRA) for Urban Public Transport to improve the quality of public transport.

With reference to buses :

  • The improvement of bus journey times by implementing Bus Expressway Transit (BET) services, and commissioning studies on the possibility of implementing dedicated bus rights of way, such as bus lanes and Bus Rapid Transit systems, and adding 850 buses on the roads between 2010 and 2012, bringing the total number of buses to 1450 by 2012; 200 new buses in 2010, 400 new buses in 2011, 250 new buses in 2012.
  • Upgrading of 634 bus stops in 2010, with plans to build an additional 306 bus stops by 2012, to ensure a bus stop is within 400m for 70% of the population by 2012
  • Reorganising the bus network in the Klang Valley
  • Implementing integrated smart ticketing “Bit Up” and “Bit Down” which was launched on February 25, 2011 by RapidKLand sold on all RapidKL buses
  • Decongesting the city center by approximately 500 express buses, with the establishment of 500 southern express buses to the Integrated Transport Terminal (ITT) in Bandar Tasik Selatan, removing the load off the Puduraya terminal. Further initiatives include a new ITT in Gombak by 2012, to cater to northbound express buses, which will decongest the city center by a further 300 express buses.
  • Introducing performance standard monitoring for all public transport services

With reference to the LRT :

  • The RapidKL LRT Kelana Jaya Line has improved its capacity and services with 22 new 4–car train sets starting from December 2009 with reduction in headway from 2.8 minutes to 2.5 minutes
  • Further initiatives include adding 35 sets of 4-car trains by 2012 and adding line extensions from Sri Petaling to Putra Heights and Kelana Jaya to Putra Heights to be operational by 2014
  • There will be interconnectivity between the MRT, LRT, and KTM Komuter. There are 2 MRT-LRT interchanges, at Pasar Seni (Kelana Jaya line) and Taman Maluri (Ampang line) and two MRT-KTM Komuter interchanges, at Sungai Buloh and Kajang. MRT will also have a station near KL Sentral, where the station will be linked to the transportation hub via an underground walkway with travellators, lifts, and escalators. The distance between the MRT station and the KL Sentral complex is about 200m.

With reference to KTM Komuter :

  • Additional 38 sets of 6-car trains to be delivered starting early 2012, doubling current capacity, with reduction in headway from 20 minutes to 7.5 minutes on major sections.
  • Through these initiatives, the share of public transport has increased to 17% in 2009, from 12% in 2008, based on an independent survey conducted by Urusbudi Transplant Sdn Bhd, and is well on track of achieving the 25% target by 2012.

The MRT will be linked to its catchment areas through an accessibility strategy. This aims to provide for, and encourage, a hierarchy of access methods. Pedestrian accessibility is given the highest priority, and facilities to make this easier will be provided.

Buses linking to stations extend the catchment significantly. Proposed feeder bus routes have been identified for all stations, in the suburban areas, and can be viewed at our website – http://mrt.com.my/g-around/MRT_Feeder_Bus.htm or http://www.spad.gov.my/land-public-transport/buses/mrt-feeder-bus-routes

People will also be able to be dropped off, or picked up, by taxis, or can use the park and ride facilities, at 13 of the 35 stations.

Driving to and parking at stations is generally discouraged, though the Park & Ride facilities will be provided at 13 selected stations, at the line-end and fringe of the city. The feeder bus strategy and routes play an important part in connecting people to the benefits of traveling on MRT.

Park and ride sites are proposed at selected stations primarily located at line-ends and at the city fringe. A total of 13 stations are being planned to have park and ride facilities with a total of 4000 parking lots

The public should not automatically think of using their cars, and have confidence that the feeder bus service will be improved to be at par with the services provided by other countries, which have well planned MRT systems. To achieve this, SPAD will conduct a thorough study on the demand and routing of feeder bus services. This will be completed ahead of the completion of the line and the feeder bus network will be ready when operation begins. SPAD will also identify suitable locations near selected stations for bus interchanges to be located. This will enable passengers to transfer from MRT to buses conveniently.

The Sungai Buloh-Kajang MRT Line will take five years to complete. While feeder bus routes for the line have been proposed and are currently on display to the public, SPAD will nevertheless conduct a thorough study on the demand and routing of such services. This will be completed ahead of the completion of the line and the feeder bus network will be ready when operation begins.

The LRT and KTM Komuter are being expanded and will form part of the transportation network for the Klang Valley. The Government is extending the LRT line for the Kelana Jaya Line, from Kelana Jaya to Putra Heights and for the Ampang Line, from Sri Petaling to Putra Heights over a total of 35 km. The existing KTM Komuter system was also extended from Sentul to Batu Caves, a distance of 7 km.

Nevertheless, the number of places where extensions of the LRT lines can serve will be limited and any further extension of the current LRT lines will end up making journey times very long and unattractive to commuters. In terms of capacity, the LRT will quickly reach its maximum limit while the MRT, which generally has 50% more capacity, will be able to comfortably satisfy the transportation needs of the Klang Valley for many years into the future.

Transparency And Costs

There are several parties involved in the project, namely:

  • Land Public Transport Commision (SPAD)
  • Steering Committee, Executive Committee, Technical Committee
  • Mass Rapid Transit Corporation Sdn Bhd (MRT Corp)
  • MMC Gamuda Joint Venture (MMC Gamuda)

The Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) is a statutory body which officially came into being on 3 June 2010 with the coming into force of the Suruhanjaya Pengangkutan Awam Darat Act 2010. The core functions of SPAD are to draw up of policies for land public transport, planning, regulation and enforcement of laws, rules and regulations concerning land public transport. The powers for the commission to carry out these functions are provided in the Land Public Transport Act 2010.

SPAD was appointed by the Government to be the supervising agency for the KVMRT project. SPAD will ensure that the planning, construction and operation of the line will follow all the necessary regulations and fulfill its ultimate objective of providing Klang Valley residents with a comfortable and efficient public transport system.

In terms of governance, the MRT project is overseen at the highest level by the Steering Committee which is chaired by YAB Prime Minister. The Steering Committee meets quarterly and drives overall policy and direction.

Beneath the Steering Committee is the Executive Committee (Exco) chaired by the Chief Secretary to the Government. This committee has been meeting weekly and involves all relevant government agencies and solves inter-agency issues.

Beneath the Exco is the Technical Committee chaired by SPAD. This Committee directly oversees the project implementation players, monitors progress of the project and makes operational and technical decisions.

All the above committees have representatives from SPAD, Prasarana and MMC-Gamuda JV as well as relevant government agencies.

We have organized an Open Day on February 13 at Mid Valley Convention Center and subsequently launched the Public Display to provide information and details on the Klang Valley MRT project to the rakyat from February 14 to May 14 at seven different locations. Details such as proposed station design and locations, features and detailed alignment will be show cased. Constructive feedback from the rakyat will be processed as well during this period before the final alignment is adopted for implementation.

Public response to the call for feedback has been very good. SPAD is receiving over 1000 unique visitors per day to the MRT website and log on an average of 30 calls per day for its telephone helpline. The feedback at the Public Display locations has also been very good. Over 90% of respondents support the project.

The Commission would like to emphasize that the 3-month long public display is to provide information and details on the Klang Valley MRT Sungai Buloh-Kajang line to the rakyat. Details such as proposed station design and locations, features and detailed alignment are being show cased. We encourage and welcome constructive feedback from the rakyat during this period. All feedback will be thoroughly evaluated and presented to the government before the final decision on the proposed alignment and location of the stations are adopted for implementation to make travelling on the Klang Valley rail network (including KTM KOMUTER and LRT) seamless and convenient for the rakyat connectivity.

The Government, through Prasarana, appointed MMC-Gamuda as the Project Delivery Partner (PDP) of the MRT project and is responsible for delivering the MRT project within agreed Target Cost and Target Completion Date. The PDP will also be responsible for packaging the works, calling tenders on behalf of the government, evaluate bids, select work package contracts with the government and makes the award on the government’s behalf to the contractors.

The PDP will also be responsible for packaging the works, calling tenders on behalf of the government, evaluating bids and selecting work packages contracts. The final decision, on which party a contract is awarded to, rests with the Government.

The PDP will not be allowed to participate in the tender for any of the work packages except for tunnelling works. The PDP is allowed to bid for this work package because of it being the only local company to have vast experience in tunnelling. Allowing it to participate in the tunnelling package not only allows the project to tap on this expertise, but also prevent any outflow of funds from the country if only foreign companies can get this job.

The decision to appoint PDP will enable the MRT to be rolled out in phases quickly, as opposed to awarding the project to a turnkey developer or have Syarikat Prasarana Negara Bhd take on the role of project management consultant (PMC).

Appointing a turnkey developer to handle the MRT project might prove to be costly should there be any variation in plans or cost. It would also be unfeasible for Prasarana to take on the role of PMC as it would need at least five years to build the competences needed to carry out the MRT project.

A project of this size and complexity carries with it significant risks of delays and cost overruns. To protect the public interest, the Government wants to take the delivery risk (time and cost) out of the project. In the traditional model where an engineering consultant is made the PMC, there would be no accountability for outcome. As their fees are usually on a cost plus basis, there is no incentive even to keep the costs in check.

In the case of the PDP, the risk of delays and cost over-runs is now borne by the PDP for a fee. The PDP provides a single point of accountability to deliver the entire project within agreed time and cost targets, or face financial penalties.

The package was awarded to MGKT in a competitive bid and MGKT’s bid was competitive both in pricing and technical know-how.

The MRT project must be delivered for the benefit of the Malaysian public in the most cost-efficient manner. Given this, SPAD has hired McKinsey as the VMC for a Value Management Study (VMS) on the Sungai Buloh-Kajang Line and tasked them with the following:

  • Reviewing design and construction practices to reduce capital expenses – e.g. design to meet functional needs at the lowest cost, removing unnecessary expenditure.
  • Offsetting the project costs with revenue generated from property development around the MRT stations.

McKinsey was hired for the following 2 reasons:

  • They bring significant depth and experience in Value Management Studies for large infrastructure projects globally, for example in Hong Kong, Japan and Australia.
  • Besides the wide global experience, they have significant experience in Malaysia, having operated in this market for at least 14 years.

In terms of governance, the MRT project is overseen at the highest level by the Steering Committee which is chaired by YAB Prime Minister. The Steering Committee meets quarterly and drives overall policy and direction.

Beneath the Steering Committee is the Executive Committee (Exco) chaired by the Chief Secretary to the Government. This committee has been meeting weekly and involves all relevant government agencies and solves inter-agency issues.

Beneath the Exco is the Technical Committee chaired by SPAD. This Committee directly oversees the project implementation players, monitors progress of the project and makes operational and technical decisions.

All the above committees have representatives from SPAD, Prasarana and MMC-Gamuda JV as well as relevant government agencies.

MRT Sungai Buloh – Serdang – Putrajaya (SSP) Line

MRT SSP Line is the second of three MRT lines identified under the Greater Kuala Lumpur Klang Valley Land Public Transport Master Plan, Urban Rail Development Plan, to be the backbone of rail-based public transport in the Kuala Lumpur and Klang Valley region.

  • It is part of the government initiative to alleviate road traffic congestion problems through a comprehensive, inter connectible, reliable and safe MRT services.
  • It also foreseen as to contribute to a cleaner environment and raise living standards of the Rakyat. The second line is crucial to cater to the increasing demand for rail-based urban public transportation.
  • The line will increase the interconnectivity of destinations and provide better integration with MRT SBK Line and other major line such as KTM Komuter, LRT, Monorail, ERL Transit lines and also the future potential rail lines such as High Speed Rail and MRT Circle Line.
  • The implementation of SSP Line is expected to contribute significantly to increase the modal share of 40% public transport use in this region and in the process making Kuala Lumpur a step closer to reaching its aspiration of being one of the most livable cities in the world.
  • The Railway Scheme was developed and submitted in compliance with Section 83 and 84 of the Land Public Transport Act 2010.
  • The Railway Scheme describes :-
    • Background, planning and development of this project.
    • It includes the proposed railway system, alignment, project structure, implementation and all related activities required from the approval phase until the commissioning and opening of the railway for operation.

About the alignment

Station Names Locations Type of Station Station Names Locations Type of Station
S01 DAMANSARA DAMAI ELEVATED S19 TUN RAZAK EXCHANGE (TRX) UNDERGROUND
S02 SRI DAMANSARA WEST ELEVATED S20 CHAN SOW LIN UNDERGROUND
S03 SRI DAMANSARA EAST ELEVATED S21 BANDAR MALAYSIA NORTH UNDERGROUND
S04 KEPONG SENTRAL ELEVATED S22 BANDAR MALAYSIA SOUTH UNDERGROUND
S05 METRO PRIMA ELEVATED S23 KUCHAI LAMA ELEVATED
S06 KEPONG BARU ELEVATED S24 TAMAN NAGA EMAS ELEVATED
S07 JINJANG ELEVATED S25 SUNGAI BESI ELEVATED
S08 SRI DELIMA ELEVATED S26 SERDANG RAYA NORTH ELEVATED
S09 KAMPUNG BATU ELEVATED S27 SERDANG RAYA SOUTH ELEVATED
S10 KENTONMEN ELEVATED S28 SERI KEMBANGAN ELEVATED
S11 JALAN IPOH HALF SUNKEN S29 UPM ELEVATED
S12 SENTUL WEST UNDERGROUND S30 TAMAN UNIVERSITI (PROVISIONAL) ELEVATED
S13 TITIWANGSA UNDERGROUND S31 EQUINE PARK ELEVATED
S14 HOSPITAL KUALA LUMPUR UNDERGROUND S32 TAMAN PUTRA PERMAI ELEVATED
S15 KAMPUNG BARU NORTH UNDERGROUND S33 16 SIERRA ELEVATED
S16 AMPANG PARK UNDERGROUND S34 CYBERJAYA NORTH ELEVATED
S17 KLCC EAST UNDERGROUND S35 CYBERJAYA CITY CENTRE ELEVATED
S18 CONLAY UNDERGROUND S36 PUTRAJAYA SENTRAL ELEVATED
Description Length No of Stations
Elevated 38.7 23 + 1 (half sunken)
Underground 13.5 11
TOTAL 52.2 35 (2 provisional)

Notes:

  1. Summary excludes 4.6km and 3 stations built under SBK Line (Kwasa Damansara to Sungai Buloh) that will become part of SSP Line upon completion.
  2. The total UG Station includes 1 no of TRX station build under SBK Line.
No. STATION LOCATIONS INTERCHANGE
KTM LRT MONORAIL SBK LINE ERL HSR
1 Kwasa Damansara
2 Sungai Buloh
3 S04 Kepong Sentral
4 S09 Kampung Batu
5 S13 Titiwangsa
6 S16 Ampang Park
7 S19 Tun Razak Exchange
8 S20 Chan Sow Lin
9 S22 Bandar Malaysia South
10 S25 Sungai Besi
11 S36 Putrajaya Sentral

Principal Parties

  • MRT network is owned by the Government of Malaysia through Mass Rapid Transit Corporation Sdn Bhd (MRT Corp).
  • Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) / Suruhanjaya is the Regulating Agency for the Project.
  • MMC-Gamuda KVMRT (PDP SSP) Sdn Bhd is the Project Delivery Partner for the development of MRT SSP Line.

Safety

PDP has taken a strong stance towards protecting workers and public safety at all MRT sites to avoid and prevent risk of unfortunate accidents. Among the proactive measures taken include:

  • Strict enforcement of the Zero Tolerance Programme, where 60 Safety Superintendents are deployed to all SSP Line worksites to monitor and extend an additional layer of policing for high-risk construction activities.
  • Review all SOPs pertaining to high-risk works such as temporary works (scaffolding, excavation, etc.), lifting and crane operations, working at heights, heavy-load transportation, and carrying out works alongside major roads.
  • Added checks by the Supervising Consultants, who work in concert with PDP Safety Superintendents.
  • Mandatory safety training for all existing WPCs, implemented since end-2014.
  • Mandatory “Safety Passport” for all MRT workers working on SSP Line.
  • Inclusion of “safety” as a key determining factor for WPCs’ performance in CONPAS in SSP Line.
  • Establishment of KVMRT Training Centre as the primary training hub for all safety, health and environment-related training for the MRT project.

Social Impact

  • Establishment of a 24-hour MRT Hotline to highlight and resolve grouses by affected stakeholders
  • Strict observance of working hours to minimise inconvenience to residents
  • Alternative traffic routes announced via MRT Corp website and news channels
  • Maintaining the number of lanes during SSP Line construction
  • Signboards for visual direction in front of commercial properties
  • Noise barriers for residential properties during and after construction
  • Adherence to all DOE guidelines in relation to construction works
  • Proven construction methods that safeguard public safety
  • All MRT workers will be housed in a gated and guarded Centralized Labour Quarters (CLQs) which will be located along the alignment.
  • This ensures that there are no ‘kongsis’ or shanty towns built along the project sites.
  • It also reduces the likelihood of workers loitering around businesses and homes in the area.
  • Entry to CLQs is strictly controlled by authorized access cards. The CLQs are equipped with various facilities to enable a comfortable living environment for all foreign workers.
  • A more efficient Traffic Management Plan (TMP) will be implemented.
  • At the working level, a dedicated Traffic team is set-up to ensure alternative routes are properly identified at an early stage.
  • A dedicated Emergency Response Team or ERT is provided by every work package contractor to cover every area on their site. The ERT teams are well-trained and are on standby 24-hours a day, in case of any emergencies at the sites.